Why a NASA spacecraft could bounce, crunch or sink on icy Europa

Why a NASA spacecraft could bounce, crunch or sink on icy Europa

Sometime in the early 2030s, NASA hopes to attempt a landing on Jupiter’s moon Europa. A four-legged spacecraft would descend towards the icy surface, ready to hunt for signs of alien life in a buried ocean.

Landing on Jupiter’s moon in search of alien life won’t be easy.

Source: Why a NASA spacecraft could bounce, crunch or sink on icy Europa

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens

University of Michigan researchers have created a transparent silver film that could be used in touchscreens, flexible displays and other advanced applications. L. Jay Guo, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, holds up a piece of the material. Credit: Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering.

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down at the University of Michigan, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made.
Source: Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens

LHCb observes an exceptionally large group of particles

A typical LHCb event fully reconstructed. Particles identified as pions, kaon, etc. are shown in different colours. (Image: LHCb collaboration)

The LHCb experiment at CERN is a hotbed of new and outstanding physics results. In just the last few months, the collaboration has announced the measurement of a very rare particle decay and evidence of a new manifestation of matter-antimatter asymmetry, to name just two examples.

The image above shows the data (black dots) of the reconstructed mass distribution resulting from the combination of the Ξc+ and K- particles. The five particle states are the five narrow peaks standing out from the distribution of data. (Image: LHCb collaboration)

 

Science journalism can be evidence-based, compelling — and wrong

A ranking of the best science-news outlets misjudges the relationship between research and reporting.
Source: Science journalism can be evidence-based, compelling — and wrong

Gravitational waves pioneer Ronald Drever dies

Ronald Drever

Scottish physicist Ronald Drever, one of the architects behind the discovery of gravitational waves, has died at the age of 85.

Source: Gravitational waves pioneer Ronald Drever dies – BBC News

The quest to crystallize time


Bizarre forms of matter called time crystals were supposed to be physically impossible. Now they’re not.
Source: The quest to crystallize time

Key experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) gets upgrade

Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

Scientists are upgrading one of the four main experiments on the world’s biggest atom smasher in hopes it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties.

Source: Key experiment at world’s biggest atom smasher gets upgrade

Vera Rubin, who did pioneering work on dark matter, dies

Vera Rubin, a pioneering astronomer who helped find powerful evidence of dark matter, has died, her son said Monday.

Source: Vera Rubin, who did pioneering work on dark matter, dies

John Glenn, First American to Orbit the Earth, Dies at 95

The last of NASA’s original seven astronauts to die, Glenn circled the planet three times in 1962

Source: John Glenn, First American to Orbit the Earth, Dies at 95 – Scientific American

Exploring the Origins and Nature of Awareness

YHouse, Inc. is a nonprofit institute in New York City. It is devoted to innovative and transdisciplinary research, intellectual partnership, and public discourse tackling humanity’s greatest questions on awareness, consciousness, and the future of intelligence.

Explore YHouse: YHousenyc.org

NASASunEarth on Twitter: “Coming up on Tuesday, Oct. 25: the 10th anniversary of the launch of STEREO, a key piece of our sun-watching fleet. https://t.co/xMTwA3Bdh6 https://t.co/bLP0fjhLGQ”

Joseph L. Birman, Physicist and Humanitarian, Dies at 89 – The New York Times

Dr. Birman was instrumental in the creation of a program that helped refugee scientists restart their careers in the United States in the 1990s.< Source: Joseph L. Birman, Physicist and Humanitarian, Dies at 89 – The New York Times

NewSpace NYC and NY Society of Security Analysts – A New Space Age Race: Interplanetary Investments

Three observations from tonight:
1) EVERYONE wants to be a leader but most are not visionaries.
2) A few are visionaries but lack the leadership, business skills and/or chutzpah to make it happen.
3) Then there are the very few with both vision and chutzpah to make it happen. But, they are not just the Musks or Bezoses, they are the smaller pioneers, some of whom I met tonight, and they are the key for getting to and crossing the tipping point to a vibrant commercial space industry/economy.

NYSSA

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Simons Observatory To Search For Origin Of The Cosmos | Simons Foundation


A new facility to be built in Chile aims to uncover what happened in the instant after the Big Bang and answer other cosmological questions.
Source: Simons Observatory To Search For Origin Of The Cosmos | Simons Foundation

USA Science and Engineering Festival – Home

USA Science and Engineering FestivalUSA Science and Engineering FestivalCelebrate STEM at the largest science festival in the country! Join the 4th USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C. April 16-17, 2016.
Source: USA Science and Engineering Festival – Home

Physicists discover flaws in superconductor theory

University of Houston physicists report finding major theoretical flaws in the generally accepted understanding of how a superconductor traps and holds a magnetic field.

Physicists discover flaws in superconductor theory

Creating the future, SODALITY…

SODALITY

Sodality is a family of tech enthusiasts and entrepreneurs who support each other through brainstorms, business incubation, and exceptional experiences.

Join the SODALITY…

Possible signature of dark matter annihilation detected

A false-color image of the anomalous gamma-ray emission from the central region of the Milky Way galaxy; this emission is suspected of coming from dark matter annihilation. In this image, the emission from conventional sources has been subtracted from the total. The region covers roughly five degrees; the brightest emission is colored red and faintest blue. Credit: Daylan et al. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-signature-dark-annihilation.html#jCp

A false-color image of the anomalous gamma-ray emission from the central region of the Milky Way galaxy; this emission is suspected of coming from dark matter annihilation. In this image, the emission from conventional sources has been subtracted from the total. The region covers roughly five degrees; the brightest emission is colored red and faintest blue. Credit: Daylan et al.

CfA astronomer Doug Finkbeiner and a team of colleagues claim to have identified just such a signature of dark matter annihilation.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-signature-dark-annihilation.html#jCp

XPrize Think Tank New York

Think_Tank_Header

XPrize Think Tank New York is a group of experts and entrepreneurs focused on using exponential technologies and innovative solutions to solve challenges that face the world today such as developing clean energy sources, eradicating poverty, providing limitless and cheap healthcare to billions, and the list goes on. Come join us and help make a better world. 

 

Physicists investigate the structure of time…

Although in theory it may seem possible to divide time up into infinitely tiny intervals, the smallest physically meaningful interval of time is widely considered to be the Planck time, which is approximately 10-43 seconds. This ultimate limit means that it is not possible for two events to be separated by a time smaller than this.

Physicists investigate the structure of time, with implications for quantum mechanics and philosophy