Category Archives: physics

A physicist who always dreamed of working in the US says it’s no longer the ‘global center of science’

“He thinks people in the US have stopped dreaming big. “

If Arkani-Hamed is right what has caused this shift? Complacency, laziness, ego, funding issues, all of the above and more?

Physicist Nima Arkani-HamedHis family zigzagged the globe in pursuit, and defense, of science. Now, he’s worried about the future of science in the US.

Source: A physicist who always dreamed of working in the US says it’s no longer the ‘global center of science’

Dawn of Private Space Science Symposium 2017 | #DPSS17

Dawn of Private Space Science 2017Bringing scientists, foundations, corporations, policy makers & private spacelines under one roof to chart the future of space science @ Columbia University
Source: Dawn of Private Space Science Symposium 2017 | #DPSS17

PPPL and Max Planck physicists reveal experimental verification of a key source of fast reconnection of magnetic fields

Physicist Will Fox with Magnetic Reconnection Experiment.

Physicist Will Fox with Magnetic Reconnection Experiment.

Magnetic reconnection, a universal process that triggers solar flares and northern lights and can disrupt cell phone service and fusion experiments, occurs much faster than theory says that it should. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Germany’s Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics have discovered a source of the speed-up in a common form of reconnection. Their findings could lead to more accurate predictions of damaging space weather and improved fusion experiments.

Click here or on the picture for the full story: PPPL and Max Planck physicists reveal experimental verification of a key source of fast reconnection of magnetic fields

Lecture: John Carlstrom – What Do We Know About The Big Bang?

John Carlstrom gives the plenary lecture at the New Horizons in Inflationary Cosmology Templeton Conference organized by the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

Our understanding of the origin, evolution and make-up of the Universe has undergone dramatic and surprising advances over the last decades. Much of the progress has been driven by measurements of the fossil light from the big bang, called the cosmic microwave background radiation, which provides us with a glimpse of the Universe as it was 14 billion years ago. This talk will discuss what we know about the Big Bang and how we learned it. We will also talk about the new questions we are asking about the origin of the Universe and the experiments being pursued to answer them, peering back to the beginning of time.

Click here for the: Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics

Quantum Questions Inspire New Math

Quantum Questions Inspire New MathIn order to fully understand the quantum world, we may have to develop a new realm of mathematics.
Mathematics might be more of an environmental science than we realize. Even though it is a search for eternal truths, many mathematical concepts trace their origins to everyday experience. Astrology and architecture inspired Egyptians and Babylonians to develop geometry. The study of mechanics during the scientific revolution of the 17th century brought us calculus.

Remarkably, ideas from quantum theory turn out to carry tremendous mathematical power as well, even though we have little daily experience dealing with elementary particles. The bizarre world of quantum theory — where things can seem to be in two places at the same time and are subject to the laws of probability — not only represents a more fundamental description of nature than what preceded it, it also provides a rich context for modern mathematics. Could the logical structure of quantum theory, once fully understood and absorbed, inspire a new realm of mathematics that might be called “quantum mathematics”?

Click here for the full article: Quantum Questions Inspire New Math

Why Doesn’t Antimatter Anti-Gravitate?

antimatter anti-gravity?

If there were some type of matter that had negative gravitational charge, it would be repelled by the matter and energy that we are aware of.

Every massive particle exerts a gravitational force. So what do antimatter particles do?

Why aren’t there any particles that fall upwards in the gravitational field of Earth? It would be so handy – If I had to move the couch, rather than waiting for the husband to flex his muscles, I’d tie an anti-gravitating weight to it and the couch would just float to the other side of the room.

Click here or on the picture for the full story: Why Doesn’t Antimatter Anti-Gravitate?

Series of New Posts: Lectures, talks, podcasts, etc…

I will be starting a regular series of posts of lectures, talks, podcasts, etc. If you have requests for topics, please feel free to comment on this post or send me a message via the contact links. The first of these posts is below:

On Oct. 7, 2015, Perimeter Institute Director Neil Turok opened the 2015/16 season of the PI Public Lecture Series with a talk about the remarkably simplicity that underlies nature. Turok discussed how this simplicity at the largest and tiniest scales of the universe is pointing toward new avenues of physics research and could lead to revolutionary advances in technology.

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Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens

University of Michigan researchers have created a transparent silver film that could be used in touchscreens, flexible displays and other advanced applications. L. Jay Guo, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, holds up a piece of the material. Credit: Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering.

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down at the University of Michigan, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made.
Source: Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens

LHCb observes an exceptionally large group of particles

A typical LHCb event fully reconstructed. Particles identified as pions, kaon, etc. are shown in different colours. (Image: LHCb collaboration)

The LHCb experiment at CERN is a hotbed of new and outstanding physics results. In just the last few months, the collaboration has announced the measurement of a very rare particle decay and evidence of a new manifestation of matter-antimatter asymmetry, to name just two examples.

The image above shows the data (black dots) of the reconstructed mass distribution resulting from the combination of the Ξc+ and K- particles. The five particle states are the five narrow peaks standing out from the distribution of data. (Image: LHCb collaboration)

 

Gravitational waves pioneer Ronald Drever dies

Ronald Drever

Scottish physicist Ronald Drever, one of the architects behind the discovery of gravitational waves, has died at the age of 85.

Source: Gravitational waves pioneer Ronald Drever dies – BBC News

The quest to crystallize time


Bizarre forms of matter called time crystals were supposed to be physically impossible. Now they’re not.
Source: The quest to crystallize time

Key experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) gets upgrade

Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

Scientists are upgrading one of the four main experiments on the world’s biggest atom smasher in hopes it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties.

Source: Key experiment at world’s biggest atom smasher gets upgrade

Vera Rubin, who did pioneering work on dark matter, dies

Vera Rubin, a pioneering astronomer who helped find powerful evidence of dark matter, has died, her son said Monday.

Source: Vera Rubin, who did pioneering work on dark matter, dies

Joseph L. Birman, Physicist and Humanitarian, Dies at 89 – The New York Times

Dr. Birman was instrumental in the creation of a program that helped refugee scientists restart their careers in the United States in the 1990s.< Source: Joseph L. Birman, Physicist and Humanitarian, Dies at 89 – The New York Times

USA Science and Engineering Festival – Home

USA Science and Engineering FestivalUSA Science and Engineering FestivalCelebrate STEM at the largest science festival in the country! Join the 4th USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C. April 16-17, 2016.
Source: USA Science and Engineering Festival – Home

Possible signature of dark matter annihilation detected

A false-color image of the anomalous gamma-ray emission from the central region of the Milky Way galaxy; this emission is suspected of coming from dark matter annihilation. In this image, the emission from conventional sources has been subtracted from the total. The region covers roughly five degrees; the brightest emission is colored red and faintest blue. Credit: Daylan et al. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-signature-dark-annihilation.html#jCp

A false-color image of the anomalous gamma-ray emission from the central region of the Milky Way galaxy; this emission is suspected of coming from dark matter annihilation. In this image, the emission from conventional sources has been subtracted from the total. The region covers roughly five degrees; the brightest emission is colored red and faintest blue. Credit: Daylan et al.

CfA astronomer Doug Finkbeiner and a team of colleagues claim to have identified just such a signature of dark matter annihilation.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-signature-dark-annihilation.html#jCp

Physicists investigate the structure of time…

Although in theory it may seem possible to divide time up into infinitely tiny intervals, the smallest physically meaningful interval of time is widely considered to be the Planck time, which is approximately 10-43 seconds. This ultimate limit means that it is not possible for two events to be separated by a time smaller than this.

Physicists investigate the structure of time, with implications for quantum mechanics and philosophy

Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein’s prediction

Source: Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein’s prediction

Taming Superconductors With String Theory | Quanta Magazine

The physicist Subir Sachdev borrows tools from string theory to understand the puzzling behavior of high-temperature superconductors.

Taming Superconductors With String Theory | Quanta Magazine

Time Entanglement Raises Quantum Mysteries | Quanta Magazine

Time Entanglement Raises Quantum Mysteries | Quanta Magazine

Quantum Weirdness Now a Matter of Time Bizarre quantum bonds connect distinct moments in time, suggesting that quantum links — not space-time — constitute the fundamental structure of the universe.

Source: Time Entanglement Raises Quantum Mysteries | Quanta Magazine